The Impact of Adolescent Obesity on Adult Height

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Childhood obesity is a major health concern. Excess adiposity during childhood affects growth and puberty. Our aim was to assess whether genetic adult height is compromised in adolescents with obesity. Methods: In a retrospective study of 190 obese patients followed at our Pediatric Endocrinology Institute, adult height and delta height (the difference between adult height and mid-parental height) were compared to those of 150 healthy age-matched normal-weight controls. Review of medical files yielded the relevant clinical and anthropometric data of patients, controls, and parents. Results: Of the 190 obese adolescents, 150 were morbidly obese. The median adult height of morbidly obese males was 174.3 cm, of obese males 174 cm, and of normal-weight males 176 cm (p = 0.025). Delta height of morbidly obese males was-0.5 cm, of obese males-0.8 cm, and of normal-weight males, 3 cm (p < 0.0001). The median adult height of morbidly obese females was 161.3 cm, of obese females 162.8 cm, and of normal-weight females 162 cm (p = 0.37). Delta height of morbidly obese females was-1.85 cm, of obese females-0.95 cm, and of normal-weight females 0.7 cm (p = 0.019). Impairment of potential genetic height was not associated with obesity-related comorbidities. Conclusion: Adolescents with obesity showed impairment of potential genetic adult height as compared to that of normal-weight subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalHormone Research in Paediatrics
Volume88
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescent obesity
  • Adult height
  • Delta height
  • Genetic potential height
  • Obesity-related comorbidities

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Impact of Adolescent Obesity on Adult Height'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this