The future of imaging spectroscopy - Prospective technologies and applications

Michael E. Schaepman, Robert O. Green, Stephen G. Ungar, Brian Curtiss, Joe Boardman, Antonio J. Plaza, Bo Cai Gao, Susan Ustin, Raymond Kokaly, John R. Miller, Stéphane Jacquemoud, Eyal Ben-Dor, Roger Clark, Curtiss Davis, Jeff Dozier, David G. Goodenough, Dar Roberts, Gregg Swayze, Edward J. Milton, Alex F.H. Goetz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Spectroscopy has existed for more than three centuries now. Nonetheless, significant scientific advances have been achieved. We discuss the history of spectroscopy in relation to emerging technologies and applications. Advanced focal plane arrays, optical design, and intelligent on-board logic are prime prospective technologies. Scalable approaches in pre-processing of imaging spectrometer data will receive additional focus. Finally, we focus on new applications monitoring transitional ecological zones, where human impact and disturbance have highest impact as well as in monitoring changes in our natural resources and environment We conclude that imaging spectroscopy enables mapping of biophysical and biochemical variables of the Earth's surface and atmospheric composition with unprecedented accuracy.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS
Pages2005-2009
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Event2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: 31 Jul 20064 Aug 2006

Publication series

NameInternational Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS)

Conference

Conference2006 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period31/07/064/08/06

Keywords

  • Hyperspectral, applications
  • Imaging spectrometry
  • Imaging spectroscopy
  • Technology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The future of imaging spectroscopy - Prospective technologies and applications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this