The frequency and prognostic impact of fever following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

Katia Orvin, Ran Kornowski, Jihad Bishara, Tamir Bental, Amos Levi, Natalie Noam, Zaza Iakobishvili, Avital Porter, Alex Sagie, Elad Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study sought to explore the frequency and prognostic implications of infectious and noninfectious fever following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study including 194 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at our institution. We identified and characterized all patients who developed fever within the first 72 h following the procedure. We determined the etiology of the fevers (infectious vs. noninfectious) and assessed their impact on in-hospital complications and 1-year mortality. Results: Following TAVI, 65 (33.5%) patients had fever (mean age 83.7 ± 3.8 years, 70.2% female). An infectious etiology was evident in only 17 of the 65 patients (26.1%) with fever, mainly due to pneumonia (52.9%) and a urinary tract infection (41.2%). No significant difference was observed in baseline characteristics, the mean fever temperature/duration, or signs of inflammatory response between infectious and noninfectious fevers. The mean hospital duration was longer (7 ± 4.8 days vs. 4.7 ± 2.4 days, p = 0.01) among patients with an infectious fever; however, fever had no impact on the 1-year mortality rate (5.9 and 4.5%, respectively, p = 0.71). Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that, although fever was a common phenomenon after TAVI, it represented an infectious complication only in a minority of cases. Nevertheless, fever, infectious or not, had no impact on the 1-year mortality rate following TAVI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-210
Number of pages8
JournalCardiology
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Fever
  • Infection
  • Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

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