The erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation test (EAAT): A new biomarker to reveal the presence of low grade subclinical smoldering inflammation in individuals with atherosclerotic risk factors

Rivka Rotstein, Tali Landau, Abraham Twig, Ardon Rubinstein, Michael Koffler, Daniel Justo, Doron Constantiner, David Zeltser, Itzhak Shapira, Tamar Mardi, Yelena Goldin, Shlomo Berliner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Multiple acute phase proteins and atherosclerotic risk factors increase the aggregability of erythrocytes. Methods and results: We used a simple slide test and image analysis to determine the degree of erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation in the peripheral blood of 222 women and 221 men with no, one, two or more atherosclerotic risk factors. The degree of erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation correlated significantly with the concentration of commonly used variables of the acute phase response. We also showed that individuals with low erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation tend to be younger and to have fewer risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking. Conclusions: The association between increased erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation, higher concentrations of acute phase proteins, and increased atherosclerotic risk factors points to a possible clinical applicability of the erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation test (EAAT) to reveal the presence of both low-grade subclinical smoldering inflammation and morbid biology in individuals with risk factors for atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-351
Number of pages9
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume165
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Erythrocyte adhesiveness/aggregation
  • Smoldering inflammation

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