The effects of target and distractor familiarity on visual search in anxious children latent inhibition and novel pop-out

R. E. Lubow*, Paz Toren, N. Laor, Oren Kaplan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children and adolescents (ages 6-17 years) diagnosed as having an anxiety disorder were compared to matched controls on a two-stage serial visual search task in which they identified presence or absence of a unique shape presented with homogeneous distractors. Response time was examined as a function of prior experience with either target, distractor, or both, allowing for a within-subject assessment of latent inhibition (LI: slower responding to a target that was formerly a distractor against a background of distractors that were formerly targets as compared to a novel target with distractors that were formerly targets) and novel pop-out effects (NPO: faster responding to a novel target against a background of familiar former targets as compared to the condition in which both the target and distractors were novel). There were robust LI and NPO effects for both anxious and control children. However, the predicted interaction between diagnosis and LI condition was not obtained. In general, the results suggest that children with diagnosed anxiety disorder do not differ from controls on basic information processing as assessed by this visual search task. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-56
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Latent inhibition
  • Visual search

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