The effects of external counter pulsation therapy on circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with angina pectoris

Alon Barsheshet, Hanoch Hod, Michael Shechter, Orna Sharabani-Yosef, Eti Rosenthal, Israel M. Barbash, Shlomi Matetzky, Reshef Tal, Ariel G. Bentancur, Ben Ami Sela, Arnon Nagler, Jonathan Leor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: External counter pulsation therapy (ECPT) offers symptomatic relief and improves ischemia in patients with refractory angina pectoris. We aimed to determine the effects of ECPT on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Methods: We prospectively studied 25 patients with angina pectoris treated with ECPT (n = 15) or receiving standard care (n = 10). The number of EPCs positive for CD34 and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) was determined by flow cytometry and the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) was assessed in a 7-day culture, before ECPT and after 9 weeks. Results: ECPT improved anginal score from a median of 3.0 to 2.0 (p < 0.001). Concomitantly, ECPT increased EPC number from a median of 10.2 to 17.8/105 mononuclear cells (p < 0.05), and CFUs from 3.5 to 11.0 (p = 0.01). Flow-mediated dilatation was improved by ECPT from 7.4 to 12.2% (p < 0.001) and correlated with EPC-CFUs (r = 0.461, p = 0.027). The levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine were reduced by ECPT from 0.70 to 0.60 μmol/l (p < 0.01). In contrast, the same parameters did not change in the control group, before and after follow-up. Conclusions: The present pilot study shows, for the first time, that ECPT is associated with increased number and colony-forming capacity of circulating EPCs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-166
Number of pages7
JournalCardiology
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • Angina pectoris
  • Endothelial progenitor cells
  • External counter pulsation
  • Ischemia
  • Stem cells

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of external counter pulsation therapy on circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with angina pectoris'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this