The effects of dual-channel functional electrical stimulation on stance phase sagittal kinematics in patients with hemiparesis

Shmuel Springer, Jean Jacques Vatine, Alon Wolf, Yocheved Laufer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sixteen subjects (aged 54.2. ±. 14.1. years) with hemiparesis (7.9. ±. 7.1. years since diagnosis) demonstrating a foot-drop and hamstrings muscle weakness were fitted with a dual-channel functional electrical stimulation (FES) system activating the dorsiflexors and hamstrings muscles. Measurements of gait performance were collected after a conditioning period of 6. weeks, during which the subjects used the system throughout the day. Gait was assessed with and without the dual-channel FES system, as well as with peroneal stimulation alone. Outcomes included lower limb kinematics and the step length taken with the non-paretic leg. Results with the dual-channel FES indicate that in the subgroup of subjects who demonstrated reduced hip extension but no knee hyperextension (n=9), hamstrings FES increased hip extension during terminal stance without affecting the knee. Similarly, in the subgroup of subjects who demonstrated knee hyperextension but no limitation in hip extension (n=7), FES restrained knee hyperextension without having an impact on hip movement. Additionally, step length was increased in all subjects. The peroneal FES had a positive effect only on the ankle. The results suggest that dual-channel FES for the dorsiflexors and hamstrings muscles may affect lower limb control beyond that which can be attributed to peroneal stimulation alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-482
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Functional electrical stimulation (FES)
  • Gait
  • Hemiparesis
  • Kinematics

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