The effect of surgical castration on lipid metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal women

G. A. Goldman*, A. Schoenfeld, M. Royburt, L. Zeldin, B. Kaplan, J. Ovadia

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of endogenous estrogen on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Design: Prospective randomized study. Setting: Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Beilinson Medical Center and Tel-Aviv University Medical School, Israel. Subjects: Twenty-seven women, 15 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal, undergoing surgical castration (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo;oophorectomy). Method: Blood samples were drawn before the surgical intervention and after a 6-month interval. Main outcome measures: Assays were performed for estradiol, luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, and triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol/HDL as well as HDL/LDL ratio. Results: No significant differences were found in both groups, before castration and after 6 months. A modest, but statistically significant, rise in triglycerides was observed in the premenopausal group. Conclusions: The serum lipid and lipoprotein profile encountered in premenopausal and postmenopausal women were unchanged 6 months after surgical castration. The clinical significance indicates that the effect of endogenous estrogen on lipid metabolism is doubtful and should be further investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-136
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996

Keywords

  • Estrogen
  • Lipoproteins
  • Post-hysterectomy

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