The effect of shoe sole composition on in vivo tibial strains during walking

C. Milgrom*, A. Finestone, I. Ekenman, A. Simkin, M. Nyska

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that shoe sole composition can affect the level of bone strain and strain rates that contribute to the development of stress fractures, in vivo tibial strain measurements were made during treadmill walking while wearing four shoes which differed only in their sole composition. Soles of 65 Shore A polyurethane with an embedded heel air cell had significantly lower compression and shear strains and shear strain rates than soles of 65, 75 and a composite of 40/65 Shore A polyurethane with no embedded air cells. A sole composed of 65 Shore A polyurethane with an embedded air cell can potentially be protective against stress fracture in a walking shoe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)598-602
Number of pages5
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of shoe sole composition on in vivo tibial strains during walking'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this