The effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on congenital talipes equinovarus following correction with the ponseti method: A pilot study

Yael Gelfer, Sally Durham, Karen Daly, Reuven Shitrit, Yossi Smorgick, David Ewins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Ponseti method for clubfoot treatment offers satisfactory initial correction, but success correlates with abduction brace compliance, which is variable. Electrical stimulation as a dynamic intervention to prevent relapses was investigated. Data were compared to a control group. There was a significant improvement in ankle range of motion only in the study group after short-term intervention, and a trend toward greater increase in calf circumference in this group. Parental perception was positive with no compliance issues. This study suggests stimulation is feasible with potential to increase ankle range of motion and facilitate muscle activity. It could be an important adjunct in preventing relapses, however, further studies with larger groups and longer intervention and follow-up duration are necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-395
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics Part B
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • clubfoot
  • dorsiflexion
  • electrical stimulation
  • peroneal muscles
  • pirani
  • ponseti

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