The effect of body mass index reduction on intraocular pressure in a large prospective cohort of apparently healthy individuals in Israel

Dan Coster, Ariel Rafie, Noam Savion-Gaiger*, Rony Rachmiel, Shimon Kurtz, Shlomo Berliner, Itzhak Shapira, David Zeltser, Ori Rogowski, Shani Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Michael Waisbourd

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose To investigate the effect of change in body mass index (BMI) on intraocular pressure (IOP) in a large cohort of apparently healthy volunteers who underwent an annual comprehensive screening examinations. Methods This study included individuals who were enrolled in the Tel Aviv Medical Center Inflammation Survey (TAMCIS) and had IOP and BMI measurements at their baseline and follow up visits. Relationships between BMI and IOP and the effect of change in BMI on IOP were investigated. Results A total of 7,782 individuals had at least one IOP measurement at their baseline visit, and 2,985 individuals had ≥2 visits recorded. The mean (SD) IOP (right eye) was 14.6 (2.5) mm Hg and mean (SD) BMI was 26.4 (4.1) kg/m2. IOP positively correlated with BMI levels (r = 0.16, p<0.0001). For individuals with morbid obesity (BMI≥35 kg/m2) and ≥2 visits, a change in BMI between the baseline and first follow-up visits correlated positively with a change in the IOP (r = 0.23, p = 0.029). Subgroup analysis of subjects who had a reduction of at least 2 BMI units showed a stronger positive correlation between change in BMI and change in IOP (r = 0.29, p<0.0001). For this subgroup, a reduction of 2.86 kg/m2 of BMI was associated with a reduction of 1 mm Hg in IOP. Conclusions BMI loss correlated with reduction in IOP, and this correlation was more pronounced among morbidly obese individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0285759
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume18
Issue number5 May
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

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