The effect of a medical clown on pain during intravenous access in the pediatric emergency department: A randomized prospective pilot study

Ido Wolyniez, Ayelet Rimon, Dennis Scolnik, Alejandro Gruber, Oren Tavor, Eli Haviv, Miguel Glatstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. We report the effect of the presence of a medical clown during insertion of an intravenous catheter during their emergency department visit. Methods. Prospectively randomized to either the presence or absence of a male medical clown during the procedure. Pain was assessed using the Faces Pain Scale-Revised in children 4 to 7 years old, and visual analog scales in children 8 years and older. Parental situational anxiety was recorded using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory after the procedure. Results. The presence of a medical clown during a painful procedure in the pediatric emergency department tended to improve pain scores in children younger than 7 years. Parental situational anxiety was significantly reduced in parents of children older than 8 years (P =.02). Conclusion. Therapeutic clowns are useful for diminishing pain and anxiety during painful procedures being performed on children in the emergency department.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1168-1172
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume52
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • emergency department
  • pain
  • pediatrics
  • procedure
  • therapeutic clown

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