The Edgeways of Faith: The Space and Language of In-betweenness in New Delhi’s Roadside Mazaars

Rita Brara*, Ronie Parciack

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article focuses on the vernacular spaces of roadside tombs—or mazaars—of anonymous saints (commonly referred to as ‘Zinda Pir Baba’) in the heart of the contemporary Indian capital, New Delhi. These mazaars are located along the megacity’s main roads and constitute a shared space where Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs perform rituals in ways that do not classify or identify them as members of rival religious communities. The custodians of grave-shrines shape and reshape social and religious inclusiveness along vernacular and contemporary planes. Simultaneously, the makeshift environments of grave-shrines create a space of in-betweenness that ruptures gender roles, sidelines histories of power, and contests urban planning in India’s capital city.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-95
Number of pages17
JournalPORTAL: Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies
Volume18
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Communalism
  • Delhi
  • Gender
  • Grave-Shrines
  • India
  • Mazaar

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