The Disruptive Comforts of Drag: (Trans)Gender Performances among Prisoners of War in Russia, 1914–1920

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The theatrical activities of German-speaking POWs in Russia during World War I reflected the acute sense of masculine disempowerment experienced by the prisoners. At the center of this theatrical sociability were the female impersonators, usually young officers, who performed women's roles on the stage and often in everyday life in the camps.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-382
Number of pages21
JournalAmerican Historical Review
Volume111
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2006

Funding

FundersFunder number
Ariel Weiss and Natania Isaak

    Keywords

    • Area studies
    • Articles
    • Gender
    • Gender identity
    • Gender studies
    • History
    • Impersonators
    • Masculinity
    • Men
    • Performance
    • Prisoner of war camps
    • Prisoners
    • Prisoners of war
    • Prisoners of war & missing in action
    • Russia
    • Sex roles
    • Soldiers
    • Theater
    • Transgender persons
    • War
    • World War I
    • World War One
    • World wars

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