The Craving to Smoke in Flight Attendants: Relations With Smoking Deprivation, Anticipation of Smoking, and Actual Smoking

Reuven Dar, Nurit Rosen-Korakin, Oren Shapira, Yair Gottlieb, Hanan Frenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the study, the authors examined the effects of smoking deprivation, anticipation of smoking, and actual smoking on the craving to smoke. Flight attendants who were light to heavy smokers rated their craving to smoke at predetermined time points during a 2-way short flight (each leg 3-5.5 hr) and a 1-way long flight (8-13 hr). In both short and long flights, craving increased gradually and peaked as landing approached. Craving levels at the end of the 1st leg of the short flights were equal to those at the end of the long flight and were much higher than those at the parallel time point in the long flight. In the short flight, craving levels at the beginning of the 2nd leg dropped relative to the end of the 1st leg, both for participants who smoked during the intermission and for those who did not, though the drop was steeper for the former. The results provide additional evidence for the role of psychological factors in determining the craving to smoke in a naturalistic setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • craving
  • flight attendants
  • smoking
  • smoking deprivation

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