The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically reduced admissions of children with and without chronic conditions to general paediatric wards

Rachel Gavish*, Yoel Levinsky, Yotam Dizitzer, Efraim Bilavsky, Gilat Livni, Avinoam Pirogovsky, Oded Scheuerman, Irit Krause

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: We examined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on how many children were admitted to Israel's largest tertiary paediatric hospital and why they were admitted. Methods: Israel declared COVID-19 a national emergency on 19 March 2020. This study examined daily hospital admissions to our three general paediatric wards during the COVID-19 lockdown period from 20 March to 18 April 2020. These 258 admissions were compared with the 4217 admissions from the period immediately before this, 1 February to 19 March 2020, plus 1 February to 18 April in 2018 and 2019. We also compared why patients were admitted during the study period, and any pre-existing conditions, with 638 children hospitalised during the same period in 2019. Results: The mean number of daily hospitalisations during the COVID-19 lockdown period was 8.6, which was 59% lower than the 20.9 recorded during the other three periods before COVID-19. There was a significant decrease in the number of patients admitted with infectious (74%) and non-infectious (44%) aetiologies from 2019 to 2020, and these occurred among patients with (58%), and without (55%), pre-existing medical conditions. Conclusion: The Israeli COVID-19 lockdown had a dramatic effect on admissions to the paediatric wards of a tertiary hospital.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2212-2217
Number of pages6
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume110
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • coronavirus
  • hospital admissions
  • infections
  • paediatric wards
  • pre-existing conditions

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