The contribution of perceived parental support to the career self-efficacy of deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing adolescents

Rinat Michael*, Tova Most, Rachel Gali Cinamon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study examined the contribution of different types of parental support to career self-efficacy among 11th and 12th grade students (N = 160): 66 students with hearing loss (23 hard of hearing and 43 deaf) and 94 hearing students. Participants completed the Career-Related Parent Support Scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-Efficacy for the Management of Work-Family Conflict questionnaire. Different aspects of parental support predicted different types of career self-efficacies across the 3 groups. Differences among groups were also found when levels of parental support were compared. The deaf group perceived lower levels of parental career-related modeling and verbal encouragement in comparison with the hard-of-hearing students and higher levels of parental emotional support compared with the hearing participants. No significant differences were found among the research groups in career decision-making self-efficacy and self-efficacy in managing work-family conflict. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-343
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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