The Contribution of Cognitive Strategies to the Resilience of Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Non-Abused Women

Avital Kaye-Tzadok, Bilha Davidson-Arad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the contribution of four strategies—self-forgiveness, realistic control, unrealistic control, and hope—to the resilience of 100 women survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), as compared with 84 non-sexually abused women. The findings show that CSA survivors exhibited lower resilience, lower self-forgiveness, lower hope, and higher levels of posttraumatic symptoms (PTS). They also indicate that resilience was explained by the participants’ financial status, PTS severity, and two cognitive strategies—self-forgiveness and hope. Finally, PTS and hope mediated the relation between CSA and resilience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)993-1015
Number of pages23
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • childhood sexual abuse
  • cognitive strategies
  • hope
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • resilience

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