The changing clinical presentation of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: The experience of a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital

Miguel Glatstein, Gary Carbell, Kusuma Boddu Sirisha Kusuma Boddu, Annalucia Bernardini, Dennis Scolnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors reviewed the clinical and laboratory data from cases of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) diagnosed at their institution from 2006 to 2008. They assessed and compared presentation of patients with HPS over time at their institution. A total of 118 patients were included in this study. An "olive" was palpated in only 13.6% of cases. This is in contrast to older studies, where more than 50% of the patients were reported to have a palpable "olive" depending on when the study was conducted. In patients from this institution, hypochloremia was present in 23% and alkalosis in 14.4%, which are less frequent than the incidence of these abnormalities in older studies. There was a change in the additional "classical" symptoms, represented by the lower percentage of infants in whom an "olive" was palpated and the lower numbers of patients with severe electrolyte imbalances. The reason for this change appears to be the frequent use of ultrasound.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-195
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • hypertrophic pyloric stenosis
  • hypochloremia
  • metabolic alkalosis
  • olive palpated

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The changing clinical presentation of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: The experience of a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this