The association of reduced global longitudinal strain with cancer therapy-related cardiac dysfunction among patients receiving cancer therapy

Michal Laufer-Perl*, Joshua H. Arnold, Liat Mor, Nadav Amrami, Matthew Derakhshesh, Yonatan Moshkovits, Ben Sadeh, Yaron Arbel, Yan Topilsky, Zach Rozenbaum

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cardiotoxicity is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients receiving cancer therapy. The most commonly used definition is cancer therapy-related cardiac dysfunction (CTRCD) defined by a left ventricular ejection fraction reduction. Global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been implied to be superior in detecting early subclinical dysfunction. Objectives: Evaluate the prevalence of reduced GLS and whether it is associated with CTRCD development among patients receiving cancer therapy. Methods: Data were collected as part of the Israel Cardio-Oncology Registry (ICOR), a prospective registry enrolling all adult patients receiving different types of cancer therapy, who were referred to the cardio-oncology clinic. Patients were divided into two groups—reduced GLS (> − 17%) vs. preserved GLS (≤ − 17%). Multivariable analyses were adjusted for a propensity score for baseline characteristics. Results: Among 291 consecutive patients, 48 (16%) patients were included in the reduced GLS group. Overall, 11 (5%) patients developed CTRCD at following echocardiogram evaluation. Patients with preserved GLS had a significantly lower risk for CTRCD development [odds ratio (OR) 0.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03–0.41, p = 0.001], with every 1-unit improvement of GLS the risk of CTRCD decreased by 16% (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.73–0.95, p = 0.007). After adjustment for baseline characteristics, including cardiovascular risk factors and systolic function, preserved GLS remained significantly associated with a lower risk for CTRCD development (OR 0.11, 95%CI 0.02–0.64, p = 0.014), with every 1-unit improvement lowering the risk by 19% (OR 0.81, 95%CI 0.67–0.98, p = 0.032). Conclusions: Reduced GLS is common among patients receiving cancer therapy and may identify patients at increased risk for CTRCD development. Graphic abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-262
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Research in Cardiology
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • CTRCD
  • Cardio-oncology
  • Cardiotoxicity
  • GLS
  • Strain

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