The association between giant cell arteritis and ischemic heart disease: A population-based cross-sectional study

Amir Dagan, Naim Mahroum, Gad Segal, Shmuel Tiosano, Abdulla Watad, Doron Comaneshter, Arnon D. Cohen, Howard Amital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffer from inflammatory diseases often treated by large amounts of corticosteroids. Whether this inflammatory burden also carries an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity, and especially ischemic heart disease, is not clearly established. Objectives: To clarify the linkage between GCA and ischemic heart disease. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the association between GCA and ischemic heart disease, adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, among GCA patients and matched controls using the database of the largest healthcare provider in Israel. Results: The study group was comprised of 5659 GCA patients and 28,261 age and gender matched controls. The proportion of ischemic heart disease was higher in the GCA group (27.5% vs. 12.5% among controls, odds ratio 2.65). Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking were also found to have higher concurrency in GCA. After stratifying for those cardiovascular co-morbidities using logistic regression, GCA remained independently associated with ischemic heart disease with an odds ratio of 1.247 (1.146-1.357 P < 0.001). Conclusions: GCA is associated with both cardiovascular risk factors and ischemic heart disease. Healthcare professionals should not overlook this aspect of the disease when managing GCA patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-414
Number of pages4
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume19
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Giant cell arteritis
  • Inflammation
  • Ischemic heart disease

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