The association between elevated admission systolic blood pressure in patients with acute coronary syndrome and favorable early and late outcomes

Gadi Shlomai, Eran Kopel, Ilan Goldenberg, Ehud Grossman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the predictive potential of admission systolic blood pressure (SBP) on early and late outcomes is not entirely clear. We investigated the association between admission SBP in patients hospitalized for ACS and subsequent morbidity and mortality in a real world setting. The study population comprised 7645 ACS patients enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndromes Israeli Survey (ACSIS) between 2002 and 2010. We analyzed the association between admission SBP, and the rates of 7-day and 1-year all-cause mortality and of 30-day major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE). Admission SBP was categorized as low (<110 mm Hg), normal (110-140 mm Hg), high (141-160 mm Hg), and very high (>160 mm Hg). Compared with patients with normal admission SBP, those with low SBP had a significantly increased hazard ratios (HRs) for 7-day and 1-year mortality, and MACE of 2.37, 1.92, and 1.51, respectively (all P <.001). In contrast, patients with very high admission SBP had significantly decreased HRs for 7-day and 1-year mortality, and MACE of 0.46, 0.65, and 0.84, respectively (P =.004, <.001, and.07, respectively). In patients with ACS, elevated admission SBP is associated with favorable early and late outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-103
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Society of Hypertension
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular event
  • mortality outcome
  • observational study

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