The Association Between Depression and Invasive and In-situ Cervical Tumors: A Large Population Based Cohort Study

Ravit Bassal*, Varda Shalev, Vered H. Eisenberg, Orit Stein-Reisner, Eduardo Schejter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Depression has been shown to be associated with cervical tumors (CTs), an association mostly demonstrated in studies in which temporality could not have been ascertained. Objectives: To study the association between depression and CTs and the influence of co-morbidities of this association in a large cohort study. Methods: A retrospective computer-based cohort study was conducted. The cohort included 357,450 female members of Maccabi Healthcare Services. The cohort was classified as depressed or non-depressed using the International Classification of Diseases 9/10 codes. For each subgroup, demographic characteristics, behavioral characteristics, co-morbidities, and CTs diagnosis were obtained. The burden of co-morbidities was defined as the sum of major co-morbidities. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression analysis due to over-dispersion to estimate the relative risk (RR) for CTs with 95% confidence interval (95%CI). Results: Depression was diagnosed in 15,789 women. Among this group, CTs were diagnosed in 1585 (10.0%]. Among the 341,661 non-depressed, CTs were diagnosed in 4185 (1.2%). After adjustment to age and socioeconomic status, the association between depression and CTs was RR=9.2 (95%CI 8.7-9.9, P-value < 0.0001). The association between depression and CTs increased as the burden of clinical conditions increased (P-value< 0.0001). Conclusions: Women with depression are at a higher risk for CTs, especially among those who have several co-morbidities. Tighter gynecology surveillance is crucial among these women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)490-494
Number of pages5
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume25
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • cervical tumors
  • depression
  • relative risk
  • risk factors

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