The association between C-reactive protein and common blood tests in apparently healthy individuals undergoing a routine health examination

Tomer Ziv-Baran*, Asaf Wasserman, Ilana Goldiner, Moshe Stark, Shani Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Itzhak Shapira, David Zeltser, Inna Mailis, Shlomo Berliner, Ori Rogowski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered a marker of inflammation. We sought to evaluate the association between CRP level and commonly use blood tests in apparently healthy population. Methods: A cross-sectional study of all visits in a routine health examination center between 1/2002 and 7/2018. CRP, complete blood count and chemistry blood panel were evaluated in each visit. Visits of individuals who had CRP above the 99th percentile or use statins were excluded. Correlation between CRP and blood tests was evaluated in the whole cohort as well as in sub-populations. Results: Blood parameters of 33,261 visits were included. Moderate positive correlation between CRP and white blood cells count (r = 0.269), neutrophils count (r = 0.275), triglycerides (r = 0.275), alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.221) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (r = 0.220) was evaluated. Correlation with triglycerides was stronger in female then in males (r = 0.38 vs. 0.25). Uric acid was positively correlated in females and males. In participants under 30 years, inverse correlation with hemoglobin, creatinine and albumin levels and positive correlation with cholesterol were documented. Conclusion: Significant moderate association between CRP and several blood tests was evaluated in apparently healthy population. This information should be used for further studies of the relationship between inflammation and biological processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-41
Number of pages9
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume501
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Chemistry blood panel
  • Complete blood count
  • Health status
  • Inflammation

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