The areas of change questionnaire: A cross-cultural comparison of israeli and american distressed and nondistressed couples

Claire Rabin*, Gayla Margolin, Marilyn Safir, Sharon Talovic, Irit Sadeh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines Israeli couples' presenting complaints about their relationship, their perceptions of one another's complaints and perceptual accuracy between actual and perceived complaints, using the Areas of Change Questionnaire (ACQ). Samples were obtained of both distressed and nondistressed couples. Each sample met stringent criteria for categorization as distressed and nondistressed. Normative data for both samples are examined and areas of similarities and differences are discussed. The instrument is found to discriminate distressed and nondistressed Israeli couples. Results are compared with a previous study of American distressed and nondistressed couples. The American finding that women desire more change in marriage is not replicated in the Israeli sample, nor the American finding that distress and stage in the life cycle are related. However, there is an indication in both samples that men, compared to women, perceive more requests for change. Men in both cultures also feel more change is asked of them than they themselves ask in return.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-335
Number of pages12
JournalThe American Journal of Family Therapy
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The areas of change questionnaire: A cross-cultural comparison of israeli and american distressed and nondistressed couples'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this