The acute hemodynamic effects of intravenous verapamil in coronary artery disease. Assessment by equilibrium-gated radionuclide ventriculography

H. O. Klein, R. Ninio, V. Oren, R. Lang, P. Sareli, E. DiSegni, D. David, J. Guerrero, E. Kaplinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The acute hemodynamic effects of an i.v. bolus of verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg or 0.06-0.075 mg/kg, were examined by serial radionuclide studies in 46 patients with coronary artery disease. In 20 patients with ejection fractions (EFs) > 35% (group 1A), verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg given over 1-1 1/2 minutes, had a biphasic effect: first, a transient decrease in EF accompanied by increased left ventricular (LV) volumes and cardiac output equivalents; then, an overshoot of EF to values above control, accompanied by a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and a drastic decrease in LV volumes, while cardiac output equivalent remained slightly elevated. In eight patients with EFs < 35% (group 1B), only the first effect on EF was noted. In 10 patients with EFs >35% (group 2), verapamil, 0.06-075 mg/kg, exerted qualitatively similar but milder effects on hemodynamic function. Finally, verapamil, 0.1 mg/kg given more slowly, over 2-2 1/2 minutes, produced no significant changes in EF or LV volumes in another eight patients (group 3). The acute effects of verapamil are thus both time-related and dose-dependent. They are also related to the baseline functional reserve of the left ventricle. This study documents that verapamil exerts a depressant effect on LV function. However, the transient nature of this depression and the quick recovery to normal or above-normal values indicate that verapamil, in the doses used in this study, is safe to use intravenously in patients with coronary artery disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-110
Number of pages10
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

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