Temple and dynasty: Hezekiah, the remaking of Judah and the rise of the pan-Israelite ideology

Israel Finkelstein, Neil Asher Silberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article deals with the momentous events that took place in Judah in the short period of time between 732 (and mainly 722) and 701 BCE. A torrent of refugees from the North, mostly from the areas bordering on Judah, dramatically changed the demographic structure in the Southern Kingdom. The population seems to have at least doubled and included significant north Israelite communities. This situation created, in fact, a pan-Israelite state. Hezekiah reacted to this challenge in two ways, both aimed at strengthening the authority of the central government. Countryside shrines were abolished and the cult was centralized in the Jerusalem Temple, probably in an attempt to prevent the new immigrants from visiting the Bethel temple in their old homeland. In the same short period of time, the story of the early days of the Davidide dynasty was first put in writing, combining southern and northern traditions in a single national narrative.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-285
Number of pages27
JournalJournal for the Study of the Old Testament
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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