Temperature monitoring and control of CO2 laser tissue welding in the urinary tract using a silver halide fiber optic radiometer

Ofer M.D. Shenfeld, O. Eyal, Benad Goldwasser, Abraham Katzir

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Laser welding of tissues is an experimental surgical technique for the binding of tissues. The difficulty in the clinical implementation of this technique arises from the difficulty in defining the optimal conditions under which a satisfactory weld is formed. Temperature measurements of laser irradiated tissues are difficult to perform and experiments have produced conflicting results. Fiber optic radiometry allows temperature measurement of laser irradiated tissues by remote sensing of emitted infra red (IR) radiation. We developed an IR radiometer capable of accurate temperature measurements (± 0.2°C). Utilizing this radiometer for the monitoring and control of CO2 laser irradiated tissues we achieved temperature control of ± 2.5°C of tissues during welding. This system was used to perform laser welds on the urinary bladders of rats. The strength of the welds was recorded for different welding temperatures, and maximal strength was obtained at 55°C and 12 sec.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages203-214
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)0819411035, 9780819411037
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes
EventLasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: 16 Jan 199318 Jan 1993

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1876
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceLasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period16/01/9318/01/93

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