Teaching evidence-based medicine in a managed care setting: From didactic exercise to pharmacopolicy development tool

Natan R. Kahan*, Yaakov Fogelman, Dan Andrei Waitman, Ernesto Kahan, Avihu Bar-Yochai, Avraham Meidan, Eliezer Kitai

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To implement a residency-based program for the teaching of evidence-based medicine in an Israeli HMO and to incorporate this effort into the HMD's routine drug policy formulation process. Methods: Residents and preceptors participating in the family practice residency program in The Leumit Health Fund, 1 of the 4 HMOs operating in Israel, were invited to participate in a workshop for the formulation of guidelines for antibiotic treatment of the common infectious diseases encountered in primary care. The participants were allocated to teams consisting of a preceptor (an attending physician) and a resident physician, with each team choosing a different disease to analyze. Upon completion of the program, a questionnaire was sent to all residents and preceptors who participated in the workshop to evaluate attitudes concerning the outcomes of the program. Results: Guidelines for the treatment of 14 infectious diseases commonly seen in the primary care setting were formulated. The program was accepted by the participants, who ultimately cooper-ated with the relevant HMO stakeholders in the formulation of official HMO policies for drug prescribing. Conclusion: The utilization of family practice residents is a feasible method of formulating in-house clinical practice guidelines for a managed care setting. The program was mutually beneficial for both the residents and for the stakeholders in the HMO.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)570-572
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume11
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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