Tapping the social psychology of psychophysical experiments: Mode of responding does not alter statistical properties of magnitude estimates

Daniel Algom, Lawrence E. Marks, David Wiesenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In an attempt to measure how mode of response might affect psychophysical judgment, 18 subjects were asked to give magnitude estimates of the loudness of 1000-Hz tones at various sound pressure levels in each of two sessions. In one session, the subjects responded by giving their numerical judgments orally to the experimenter; in the other session, they did so by entering their judgments manually on a computer-controlled keyboard. Mode of response had no effect on the loudness function’s log-log slope and a small, statistically unreliable, effect on the function’s intercept.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)226-228
Number of pages3
JournalBulletin of the Psychonomic Society
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1991
Externally publishedYes

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