Symptoms of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in the Orthodox and Secular Jewish Communities in Israel

Sharon Iron-Segev, Danielle Best, Daniel Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Symptoms related to avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) are not well defined in the general population. The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in the presentation of ARFID-related eating disturbances between healthy, religious and secular Jewish children in Israel. Sixty-four families participated in this study. Parents completed standardized questionnaires to assess ARFID behaviors of children, parental feeding problems and overall functioning, anxiety and sensory-aversion. No significant between-group differences were found for almost all assessments. However, sensory-related pleasure and sensory-seeking behavior was greater in secular children. Overall, religious and non-religious Israeli children do not differ in parental-reported ARFID-related feeding and eating behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID)
  • Eating/feeding problems
  • Israel
  • Jewish modern-orthodox
  • Jewish ultra-orthodox
  • Stanford feeding questionnaire (SFQ)

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