Switching treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration from bevacizumab to ranibizumab who is likely to benefit from the switch?

Elad Moisseiev, Gabriel Katz, Joseph Moisseiev, Anat Loewenstein, Michaella Goldstein, Yosef Lomnicky, Yitzhak Abend, Giora Treister, Dafna Goldenberg, Hana Levkovitch-Verbin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of switching from bevacizumab to ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods: Retrospective study of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration initially treated with bevacizumab and switched to ranibizumab. Visual acuity and central retinal thickness (CRT) were retrieved at four time points: before the last three bevacizumab injections, at the switch, after the first three ranibizumab injections, and at the end of follow-up. Results: One hundred and fourteen eyes of 110 patients were included. Switching from bevacizumab to ranibizumab did not achieve a significant change in visual acuity, and a significant reduction in CRT was achieved after the first three injections but was not maintained by the end of follow-up. Eyes that lost 0.1 logMAR before the switch were more likely to improve in visual acuity (P = 0.013), and eyes with 10% increase in CRT before the switch were more likely to improve anatomically (P = 0.0003). In 47.3% of the eyes, the CRT was reduced by 10% after the first 3 ranibizumab injections, and the reduction was maintained with additional injections. Conclusion: Switching to ranibizumab should be considered in patients with visual acuity decrease or CRT increase, despite monthly bevacizumab injections. The response should be evaluated after the first three injections to guide future treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1323-1330
Number of pages8
JournalRetina
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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