Surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen surgery

Yael Oestreicher-Kedem, Sumit Agrawal, Robert K. Jackler, Edward J. Damrose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to determine the patient population that will benefit from surgical rehabilitation of voice and swallowing after jugular foramen tumor (JFT) resection. Methods: We performed a retrospective case study of patients with a history of JFT resection. The patients' files were reviewed for data on preoperative and postoperative function of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, voice and swallowing function, and surgical procedures for voice and swallowing rehabilitation and their timing. Results: Twenty-one patients underwent JFT resection. Thirty-eight percent presented with deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII, and 61% developed new postoperative deficits. Three patients recovered glossopharyngeal nerve function, 2 recovered vagus nerve function, and 1 recovered facial nerve function. Surgical rehabilitation procedures were undertaken in 8 patients. Patients who eventually underwent surgical rehabilitation procedures for voice and swallowing tended to have larger tumors, tumors within the nerve bundle in the jugular foramen, and multiple nerve deficits. Conclusions: Most patients with multiple deficits of cranial nerves VII and IX through XII after JFT resection are unlikely to regain spontaneous nerve function, will experience long-term dysphonia and dysphagia, and will elect to undergo corrective surgery to improve voice and swallowing. Preoperative evaluation and close postoperative follow-up can identify patients who would benefit from early surgical rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-198
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume119
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dysphagia
  • Hoarseness
  • Jugular tumor
  • Rehabilitation
  • Swallowing

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