Surgical intervention after medical treatment for early pregnancy loss according to gestational size

Ohad Gluck*, Elad Barber, Ori Tal, Ram Kerner, Eran Weiner, Ron Sagiv

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To study the rate of surgical intervention for unsuccessful medical treatment in early pregnancy loss (EPL), according to gestational size by ultrasound (GS-US). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. All women who were treated with misoprostol for EPL between July 2015 and December 2020 were included. The cohort was divided according to GS-US: group 1: gestational sac without an embryonic pole; group 2: an embryonic pole with crown-rump length (CRL) compatible with <7 weeks; group 3: CRL compatible with 7+0–7+6 weeks; group 4: CRL compatible with 8+0–8+6 weeks; group 5: CRL compatible with ≥9 weeks. We compared the rate of any surgical intervention due to treatment failure. Results: Overall, 783 patients were included: group 1, 236 (30.1%); group 2, 319 (40.7%); group 3, 115 (14.7%); group 4, 78 (10.0%); and group 5, 35 (5.0%) patients. The rate of any surgical intervention was significantly lower in groups 1–4 (54, 22.9%; 85, 26.6%; 28, 24.3%; and 22, 28.2%, respectively) compared with group 5 (17, 48.6%; P = 0.030). On multivariant analysis, GS-US greater than 9 weeks was independently associated with the need for surgical intervention (adjusted odds ratio 1.23, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.51; P = 0.040). Conclusion: When treating EPL medically, GS-US greater than 9 weeks increases the risk of undergoing additional surgical intervention compared with younger weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)933-938
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume160
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2023

Keywords

  • early pregnancy loss
  • gestational size
  • misoprostol
  • ultrasound

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