Surface coil spectroscopic imaging: Time and spatial evolution of lactate production following fluid percussion brain injury

Y. Cohen*, T. Sanada, L. H. Pitts, L. ‐H Chang, M. C. Nishimura, P. R. Weinstein, L. Litt, T. L. James

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Detailed temporal and spatial distributions of lactate production are presented for graded fluid‐percussion brain injury in the rat. A one‐dimensional proton spin‐echo spectroscopic imaging (ID SESI) technique, performed with a surface coil, is presented and evaluated. This technique, which represents a practical compromise, provides spatially localized proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) brain spectra from a series of small voxels (<0.15 cm3) in less than 10 min, thus enabling both spatial and temporal monitoring of lactate production. These high‐resolution lactate maps are correlated with hyperintense regions observed in T2‐weighted images taken 10 h after impact, which, in turn, correlate with histology. The data demonstrate that, following severe trauma there is delayed production and propagation of lactate to regions of the brain that are remote from the trauma site. The extent of lactate production depends on the severity of impact. More significantly, the data show that following severe trauma, local lactate concentrations exceed 15 μmol/ g, the concentration that has been claimed as the threshold for brain injury. Therefore high lactate levels cannot be ruled out a priori as a possible factor in brain injury following severe head trauma. © 1991 Academic Press, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-236
Number of pages12
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1991
Externally publishedYes

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Institute of General Medical SciencesR01GM034767

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