Supervisor Undermining, Social Isolation and Subordinates’ Problematic Drinking: The Role of Depression and Perceived Drinking Norms

Ronit Montal-Rosenberg, Peter A. Bamberger, Inbal Nahum-Shani, Mo Wang, Mary Larimer, Samuel B. Bacharach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Findings regarding the mechanism underlying the impact of supervisor incivility on subordinate alcohol misuse remain equivocal. Specifically, some studies indicate that stress mediates the impact of supervisor incivility on subordinate alcohol misuse, while others, find no evidence for such an effect, suggesting the need to investigate other mechanisms. Extending Conservation of Resource (COR) theory and employing a longitudinal study design, this study examines two alternative mechanisms grounded on social isolation. The first suggests drinking as a resource-mobilizing response, with social isolation eliciting the perception of more permissive injunctive drinking norms, thus facilitating problematic drinking. The second suggests problematic drinking as a mode of coping with a negative emotional state elicited by social isolation, namely depression. Findings indicate that supervisor undermining’s association with subsequent subordinate problematic drinking is serially mediated by social isolation and depression, with no support found for the first mechanism. Implications for research, practice and policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • alcohol misuse
  • depression
  • social isolation
  • supervisor incivility

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