Superlatent inhibition and spontaneous recovery: Differential effects of pre- and postconditioning CS-alone presentations after long delays in different contexts

R. E. Lubow*, L. G. De la Casa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In two pairs of three-stage conditioned taste aversion experiments, we examined the effects of delay interval (1 or 21 days) between the second and third stages, and of context in which the animals spent the delay (same as or different from the context of the other stages) on latent inhibition (LI) and spontaneous recovery following extinction. In the LI experiments (Experiments 1A and 1B), the first stage comprised nonreinforced presentations to saccharin or to water. In the second stage, rats were conditioned by saccharin paired with LiCl. In the extinction experiments (Experiments 2A and 2B), the order of the stages was reversed. For all experiments, Stage 3, the test stage, consisted of three presentations of saccharin alone. There was a super-LI effect in the saccharin-preexposed group that spent the 21-day delay in the different context (Experiment 1A). When the delay was spent in the same context, there was no difference in the amount of LI between the short- and long-delay groups (Experiment 1B). Conversely, there was a spontaneous recovery effect in the long-delay/same-context group (Experiment 2B), but not in the long-delay/different-context group (Experiment 2A). The pattern of results, incompatible with current explanations of delay-induced changes in memory performance, was interpreted in terms of an interaction between the delay conditions (same or different delay context), which modulate the extinction of previously acquired context-CS-nothing associations (during CS-alone presentations), and primacy effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-386
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal Learning and Behavior
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

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