Suicidal ideation among young adults: Effects of perceived social support, self-esteem, and adjustment

Zofnat Lieberman, Zahava Solomon, Karni Ginzburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors examined the direction and extent of the effects of adjustment, perceived social support, and self-esteem on suicidal ideation among young adults exposed to stress. Two hundred thirty male soldiers in compulsory service applying for aid at medical clinics filled out self-report questionnaires. Findings showed that personal resources affect suicidal ideation both directly and indirectly. Both resources studied had moderating effects on the association between adjustment level and suicidal ideation. Furthermore, level of distress mediated the effect of perceived social support on suicidal ideation. Combining moderating and mediating models introduces a comprehensive pattern in which adjustment and resources affect suicidal ideation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-181
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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