Students’ knowledge on emotion expression and recognition in computer-mediated communication: A comparative case study

Omer Keynan*, Noa Brandel, Benzi Slakmon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we explore processes of emotion expression and recognition in computer-mediated civic discussions in small groups. We ask what generates processes of emotion expression and recognition in digital discussions, what constitutes the emotion expression and recognition practices used in such contexts, and in what ways these practices are affected by medium. Ninety-eight participants took part in both written and video discussions and filled out questionnaires concerning their emotional experiences. Some of these participants were interviewed. A two-tiered thematic and linguistic analysis was applied to the data collected from the discussions and the interviews (totaling 7139 utterances). Findings reveal four generators giving rise to discussants' emotion expression and recognition processes, including firmness of the discussants' opinions and their cultural and religious background. Practices of emotion expression and recognition appear to vary substantially between written and face-to-face settings. For example, in the latter, participants rely heavily on tone of voice and facial expressions when recognizing others’ emotions, while in the former, because of the lack of non-verbal cues, discussants assign more weight to their own emotions, experiences, and background. Moreover, participants choose their words more carefully, and are more likely to delay their response or to remain silent when expressing their emotions in writing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104597
JournalComputers and Education
Volume189
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Adult learning
  • Learning communities
  • Media in education

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