Structure of difficulties in mate-selection decisions and its relationship to rational and intuitive cognitive styles

Shoshana Shiloh*, Meyrav Shenhav-Sheffer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A taxonomy of decision-making difficulties was tested on mate-selection decisions, and related to analytic-rational and intuitive-experiential thinking styles. A total of 210 individuals completed the mate-selection decision-difficulties questionnaire, and the rational-experiential inventory. The empirical structure of mate-selection decision difficulties replicated the structure of career decision-making difficulties. Difficulties were divided into three categories: lack of readiness (before the process), and lack of information and inconsistent information (during the decision process). The total score of decision difficulties related negatively to the rational style, and was positively, but less strongly, related to the intuitive style. Intuitive style was positively correlated with three specific difficulties: lack of motivation, dysfunctional myths, and internal conflicts. The theoretical implications with regard to the generality of decision difficulties' structure, and their association with rationality and intuition are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-273
Number of pages15
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Keywords

  • Cognitive-experiential self-theory
  • Decision difficulties
  • Intuition
  • Mate selection
  • Rationality

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