Stress fractures in military recruits. A prospective study showing an unusually high incidence

C. Milgrom, M. Giladi, M. Stein, H. Kashtan, J. Y. Margulies, R. Chisin, R. Steinberg, Z. Aharonson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a prospective study of 295 male Israeli military recruits a 31% incidence of stress fractures was found. Eighty per cent of the fractures were in the tibial or femoral shaft, while only 8% occurred in the tarsus and metatarsus. Sixty-nine per cent of the femoral stress fractures were asymptomatic, but only 8% of those in the tibia. Even asymptomatic stress fractures do, however, need to be treated. Possible explanations for the unusually high incidence of stress fractures in this study are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)732-735
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series B
Volume67
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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