Stigma of school counselling among Israeli adolescents as a function of ethnicity, counselling orientation and contact frequency

Zipora Magen*, Michael Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The stigma of counselling frequently affects those groups who need it most. This has certainly been the case in junior high schools in Israel. The research focused on the attitudes toward counselling of 2296 Israeli adolescents. Data analysis showed that students of Asian-African origin (Oriental) who occupy a lower socio-economic stratum, feel more stigmatized by counselling than their European-American origin (Ashkenasic) counterparts, even though they appreciate it more. Both groups experienced less stigma when the counselling service was hybridized with normative functions. Moreover, expanding the frequency of contact with the counsellor was found to increase rather than eliminate vulnerability to stigma among the Oriental students, thus suggesting that varying the nature, and therefore the perception, of the service is a more productive approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-35
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal for the Advancement of Counselling
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1988

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