Statistical signal processing approach to DNA repair

Ram Sever*, Hagit Messer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Signal processing, and especially statistical signal processing, is a field in which generic tools for modeling, analysis and processing of signals are developed. Traditionally, it has been used in technology, and most modern technological systems apply advanced signal processing. However, the post-genomic era introduces challenges which, from a signal processing point of view, may lead to new understanding and promising results. We suggest to apply statistical signal processing tools to the problem of DNA repair, where nature operates as a master engineer. The DNA repair process consists of small machines (proteins, enzymes), which continuously transmit and receive signals from each other. The system regulates its operation; it has feedback loops and backup paths. We suggest modeling the components of the DNA repair system by a probability Markov state diagram.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2005 IEEE ICASSP '05 - Proc. - Design and Implementation of Signal Proces.Syst.,Indust. Technol. Track,Machine Learning for Signal Proces. Education, Spec. Sessions
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages781-784
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)0780388747, 9780780388741
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, ICASSP '05 - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: 18 Mar 200523 Mar 2005

Publication series

NameICASSP, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing - Proceedings
VolumeV
ISSN (Print)1520-6149

Conference

Conference2005 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, ICASSP '05
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period18/03/0523/03/05

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