Stamped and incised jar handles from Rogem Gannim and their implications for the political economy of Jerusalem, late 8th–early 4th centuries BCE

Raphael Greenberg, Gilad Cinamon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Twenty-two stamped and incised jar handles found at the site adjacent to the largest of the tumuli west of Jerusalem provide evidence for continuous administrative/commercial activity in the region during the late Iron Age and Persian period. This evidence underscores the highly specialized character of economic activity in the Nahal Refa'im basin, borne out by the discovery of several dozen winepresses of late Iron–Persian date. A significant connection with the administrative centre at Ramat Rahel is indicated, suggesting that the expansion into this previously underexploited ecological zone was state-sponsored, necessitated by the sudden growth of Jerusalem and the Judean economy in the late 8th–7th century BCE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-243
Number of pages15
JournalTel Aviv
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

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