Stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis does not compromise clinical outcome of minimally invasive tubular decompression in patients with spinal stenosis

Morsi Khashan, Khalil Salame, Dror Ofir, Zvi Lidar, Gilad J. Regev*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Objectives: In recent literature, the routine addition of arthrodesis to decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) with concomitant stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical outcome, complication and re-operation rates following minimally invasive (MIS) tubular decompression without arthrodesis in patients suffering from LSS with or without concomitant stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: This study is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Ninety-six consecutive patients who underwent elective MIS lumbar decompression with a mean follow-up of 27.5 months were included in the study. The spondylolisthesis (S) group comprised 53 patients who suffered from LSS with stable degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the control (N) group included 43 patients suffering from LSS without spondylolisthesis. Outcome measures included complications and revision surgery rates. Pre-and post-operative visual analog scale (VAS) for both back and leg pain was analyzed, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to evaluate functional outcome. Results: The two groups were comparable in most demographic and preoperative variables. VAS for back and leg pain improved significantly following surgery in both groups. Both groups showed significant improvement in their ODI scores, at one and two years postoperatively. The average length of hospital stay was significantly higher in patients with spondylolisthesis (p-value< 0.01). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of post-operative complications rates or re-operation rates. Conclusions: Our results indicate that MIS tubular decompression may be an effective and safe procedure for patients suffering from LSS, with or without degenerative stable spondylolisthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1270
JournalMedicina (Lithuania)
Volume57
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Decompression
  • Minimally invasive
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Spondylolisthesis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis does not compromise clinical outcome of minimally invasive tubular decompression in patients with spinal stenosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this