Speech intelligibility, loneliness, and sense of coherence among deaf and hard-of-hearing children in individual inclusion and group inclusion

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Abstract

This study examined the sense of coherence and loneliness of 19 children aged 12-14 years with severe to profound hearing loss. These feelings and their interrelations with speech intelligibility (SI) were examined in 2 settings: in special classes within regular schools (group inclusion) or individuals integrated into regular classes (individual inclusion). Two self-report measures (Loneliness Questionnaire and Sense of Coherence Scale) and one SI measure were utilized. Results indicated no significant differences between sense of coherence and loneliness scores of children in the 2 settings. Children in group inclusion received a significantly lower average SI score than did children who were in individual inclusion. Examination of the relations between SI and loneliness and coherence in each educational setting revealed no significant relations among these measures for the children in the group inclusion, whereas significant correlations did emerge for the children who were in individual inclusion. The study emphasized the importance of good SI not only for basic communication but also as a factor that affects the child's social and emotional feelings. In selecting a school setting, it is important to look beyond academic factors and not to ignore the significant effect of SI on the child's well being in school.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-503
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

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