Spatial heterogeneity in dead sea surface temperature associated with inhomogeneity in evaporation

Pavel Kishcha*, Boris Starobinets

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spatial heterogeneity in Dead Sea surface temperature (SST) was pronounced throughout the daytime, based on METEOSAT geostationary satellite data (2005–2015). In summer, SST peaked at 13 LT (local time), when SST reached 38.1 C, 34.1 C, and 35.4 C being averaged over the east, middle, and west parts of the lake, respectively. In winter, daytime SST heterogeneity was less pronounced than that in summer. As the characteristic feature of the diurnal cycle, the SST daily temperature range (the difference between daily maxima and minima) was equal to 7.2 C, 2.5 C, and 3.8 C over the east, middle, and west parts of the Dead Sea, respectively, in summer, compared to 5.3 C, 1.2 C, and 2.3 C in winter. In the presence of vertical water mixing, the maximum of SST should be observed several hours later than that of land surface temperature (LST) over surrounding land areas due to thermal inertia of bulk water. However, METEOSAT showed that, in summer, maxima of SST and LST were observed at the same time, 13 LT. This fact is evidence that there was no noticeable vertical water mixing. Our findings allowed us to consider that, in the absence of water mixing and under uniform solar radiation in the summer months, spatial heterogeneity in SST was associated with inhomogeneity in evaporation. Maximal evaporation (causing maximal surface water cooling) took place at the middle part of the Dead Sea, while minimum evaporation took place at the east side of the lake.

Original languageEnglish
Article number93
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Dead Sea
  • Diurnal cycle
  • Evaporation
  • Land surface tempera-ture
  • Saline lakes
  • Sea surface temperature

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