Solitons phenomena in highly nonlocal media: From soliton wiring and surface solitons to random-phase solitons and controlling solitons from afar

Carmel Rotschild, Barak Alfassi, Ofer Manela, Tal Schwartz, Assaf Barak, Mordeehai Segev, Oren Cohen, Zhiyong Xu, Yaroslav Kartashov, Lluis Torner, Demetri N. Christodoulides

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Solitons are self-localized wave-packets arising from a robust balance between dispersion and nonlinearity. They are a universal phenomenon, displaying properties typically associated with particles [1]. Until recently, the vast majority of soliton-research was focused on solitons in nonlinear media with a local response. As such, the interactions between solitons were limited to "nearest neighbors" at close proximity. This feature poses an upper limit to the complexity of a system constructed from solitons as building blocks, for example, a soliton-based computing scheme [2]. In addition, for scalar (single-field) solitons, in the integrable self-focusing Kerr system as well as in all saturable nonlinearities, only the simplest solitons are stable: those possessing a bell-shape structure.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLEOS 2007 - IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting Conference Proceedings
Pages618-619
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event20th Annual Meeting of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society, LEOS - Lake Buena Vista, FL, United States
Duration: 21 Oct 200725 Oct 2007

Publication series

NameConference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS
ISSN (Print)1092-8081

Conference

Conference20th Annual Meeting of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society, LEOS
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityLake Buena Vista, FL
Period21/10/0725/10/07

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