Snout contact fixation, climbing and gnawing during apomorphine stereotypy in rats from two substrains

Henry Szechtman, Kurt Ornstein, Philip Teitelbaum, Ilan Golani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Apomorphine, at doses ≥10 mg/kg (intraperitoneally), produced two patterns of stereotypy. In rats from one supplier it induced predominantly gnawing while in those from another predominantly climbing, suggesting that the response to the drug is influenced by genetic and/or experiential factors. At lower doses, apomorphine induced climbing in both groups (ED50 = 1.4 mg/kg in each group) but oral behavior in only one of them (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg in one, and 8 mg/kg in the second group). Thus, at a given dose of apomorphine, different patterns of stereotypy may result from an interaction between two phenomena: the relative setting of the thresholds to mouth and to climb, and an inverse relation between oral activity and climbing. Analysis of climbing suggests that this response is comprised of two (previously unidentified) fundamental effects of apomorphine: snout contact fixation and bodywise forward progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)385-392
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Jun 1982

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