Sleep differentially affects early and late neuronal responses to sounds in auditory and perirhinal cortices

Yaniv Sela, Aaron Joseph Krom, Lottem Bergman, Noa Regev, Yuval Nir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A fundamental feature of sleep is reduced behavioral responsiveness to external events, but the extent of processing along sensory pathways remains poorly understood. While responses are comparable across wakefulness and sleep in auditory cortex (AC), neuronal activity in downstream regions remains unknown. Here we recorded spiking activity in 435 neuronal clusters evoked by acoustic stimuli in the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and in AC of freely behaving male rats across wakefulness and sleep. Neuronal responses in AC showed modest (~10%) differences in response gain across vigilance states, replicating previous studies. By contrast, PRC neuronal responses were robustly attenuated by 47% and 36% during NREM sleep and REM sleep, respectively. Beyond the separation according to cortical region, response latency in each neuronal cluster was correlated with the degree of NREM sleep attenuation, such that late (>40 ms) responses in all monitored regions diminished during NREM sleep. The robust attenuation of late responses prevalent in PRC represents a novel neural correlate of sensory disconnection during sleep, opening new avenues for investigating the mediating mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2895-2905
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume40
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Auditory
  • NREM
  • Perirhinal
  • REM
  • Single-unit
  • Sleep

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